Stop losing your prospect’s attention

Geico just came out with some fantastic Youtube commercials that are designed to grab attention immediately.They are putting these on Youtube as preroll ads, which are notorious for being skipped as soon as possible.They identified the problem most Youtube advertisers face, which is that after 5 seconds, the viewer can skip the ad. This happens almost always.It is not because the ad is bad, but because they didn't change the ad based on the marketing medium. They are taking their TV ads and putting them on Youtube.The viewer behavior is completely different on Youtube than on television, and if you want to keep the viewer from skipping the ad, you need to change the message so that there is a strong hook within the first 5 seconds.​You can read a more in-depth article on this from AdWeek by clicking here. It opens in a new window. I have embedded the four Geico ads below if you want to see them.​They are a great reminder to us marketers to be sure we are grabbing our prospect's attention immediately.Regardless of the format for an ad or sales pitch, we only have a certain amount of time within which the prospect will either keep reading (or watching). Otherwise, they will move on to something else.It is also a good reminder that we might need to change our message or approach based on the media in which that message is being delivered.Enjoy the ads and remember to leave your comments below!I hope this post was informative, as well as fun! Please share your thoughts below.​If you enjoyed this post, please...

One is Greater Than Zero

I ran across the following video from Gary Vaynerchuk.​It is less than 3 minutes and I highly recommend watching it. It is quite inspiring!​Sometimes as marketers we skip over the little things. Maybe we don't do a guest blog because the person only has a handful of readers, or we turn down a podcast interview because the podcaster is just starting out. Gary explains why that's a bad idea and shows, by his own example, the way to grow and succeed by doing the little things.Click here for Gary's blog post with the original posting of this video.​Please leave a comment below with your thoughts on the topic!​​​If you like this page, please...

Is the money in the list?

Within the Internet marketing industry, there's a popular saying: “The money’s in the list.” This means the people who are making “the big bucks” are making it from their email list, not from their product launches. Is it true? If we only look at the math, it would seem to indicate it might be true. In the marketing circles where I hang out, a marketer can typically make between $2 and $3 a month for every person on their email list. As an example, let's say they sell a product for $27 and give a 75% commission to the affiliates. They are making, on sales from affiliates, a gross profit of $6.75 per sale. Of course, they have payment processor fees, etc. to also take from that, but we’ll use the $6.75 figure for our purposes here. The buyer gets put on an email list, if the launch is set up properly. The product creator earned $6.75 for the initial purchase. If the marketer is of average ability, the marketer will make between $2 and $3 a month from that customer from that point on, as long as they stay on the marketer's email list. It will only take 3 - 4 months before the profit from the email list surpasses the profit from the initial sale. Even if a customer stays on their list for only 12 months, the total earnings for the marketer will be $6.75 from the initial sale, and an additional $24 to $36 from email marketing. So, it would seem the math supports the statement, “The money’s in the list.” Is it really true?...

Curse it all … or not?

There was a debate recently on Facebook that became very public and at times a bit ugly. However, both sides raised quite interesting points, all worthy of discussion. I am not going to mention the two individuals involved, but I will say I respect both of them for what they do. The issue was over using what most people would consider to be "foul language" in their marketing materials, and in emails to their list. The "pro" side was taken by a well-known copywriter. He's a younger, "edgy" mentor-type, who very successfully teaches and coaches other people in how to write successful copy that converts. He has an in-your-face personality and does not censor his opinions, nor his language. The "con" side was taken by an older gentleman (relatively speaking) who is longtime successful marketer. He prides himself in having a professional image, and has built a large following based on that image. There is validity to the reasoning each of them brought to the table. The copywriter, in presenting the "pro" side, stated that if in your normal, everyday conversation, that was the language you use, then it was perfectly acceptable to use it in business materials. He did say that if you are intentionally developing a persona that would not use that language, then you simply wouldn’t use it while writing as that persona. Not that it would be inappropriate, but only that it wouldn’t be appropriate for that persona. He made the case that your target audience needs to be comfortable. If they're comfortable hearing from someone who uses that type of language, then not only...